24 Hour Helpline   510-839-8900 English       510-502-8560 Espanol      Helplines are staffed 24/7 by A.A. member volunteers who have solved their drinking problem.

Alcoholism Recovery Program

Can't Stop Drinking?

There is a solution

Drinking Problem?

Learn how others solved the drink problem.

Call or Email for Help!

Find the help you need. Members of AA contribute their time giving back freely what was freely given.

510-839-8900

help@eastbayaa.org

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Public Information

What is AA?, Organization and Self-Support, Myths, Anonymity, What to Expect from a Meeting

Public Information

AA is a peer mentoring program of recovery. The original twelve step program for recovery from alcoholism.

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For Professionals

Resources for professionals who work with alcoholics

For Professionals

Information for professionals looking to refer. The solution comes from understanding the problem.

Learn how you can help.
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Members/Groups

Announcements, Bookstore, Events, Meetings, Newsletter, Service Opportunities

Member Services

Service keeps us sober
Service Committees
Ways to get involved
Learn how you can help carry the message to the still suffering alcoholic
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Alcoholism Recovery Program

Alcoholics Anonymous is an alcoholism recovery program with one primary purpose:  to carry the message of recovery to alcoholics who still suffer.

If you are having trouble with your drinking
or do not not understand alcoholism, you may
be interested in the program of recovery offered
by Alcoholics Anonymous

A.A. - Saving Lives for Over 80 Years

AA is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements.

Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about their drinking problem.

  • AA members share their experience, strength, and hope with anyone seeking help with a drinking problem; they give person-to-person assistance and/or sponsorship to the alcoholic regardless of how they get to AA.
  • AA offers a variety of meetings, including meetings for people of color, women, LGBTQ+ and gender non-conforming folks, beginners, young people, atheists, agnostics, as well as all-inclusive meetings, for anyone with a desire to stop drinking.
  • The AA program if recovery, set forth in our Twelve Steps, offers the alcoholic a way to develop a satisfying life without alcohol.
  • AA meetings are where the message of recovery, our common problem with a common solution will be shared with the newcomer.

Alcoholism Recovery Program

Alcoholics Anonymous is an alcoholism recovery program with one primary purpose:  to carry the message of recovery to alcoholics who still suffer.

If you are having trouble with your drinking
or do not not understand alcoholism, you may
be interested in the program of recovery offered
by Alcoholics Anonymous

A.A. - Saving Lives for Over 80 Years

AA is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements.

Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about their drinking problem.

  • AA members share their experience, strength, and hope with anyone seeking help with a drinking problem; they give person-to-person assistance and/or sponsorship to the alcoholic regardless of how they get to AA.
  • AA offers a variety of meetings, including meetings for people of color, women, LGBTQ+ and gender non-conforming folks, beginners, young people, atheists, agnostics, as well as all-inclusive meetings, for anyone with a desire to stop drinking.
  • The AA program, set forth in our Twelve Steps, offers the alcoholic a way to develop a satisfying life without alcohol.
  • AA meetings are where the message of recovery, our common problem with a common solution will be shared with the newcomer.

There is Hope

A New Design for Living

Alcoholics Anonymous
We Can Help

In AA, our experience is that none of us can recover alone, but that together we can.

AA does not diagnose anyone with a drinking problem.

“We do not like to pronounce any individual as alcoholic, but you can quickly diagnose yourself.”

AA was the first alcoholism recovery program that recognized the importance of self-admission or self- diagnosis for those suffering with a drinking problem.

Self-identification is the First Step of the Twelve Step recovery program.

If you think you have a problem with your drinking, if you cannot stop drinking on your own, ask yourself these simple questions:

Can you control how much you drink every time you drink?

Can you quit drinking and stay away from alcohol entirely on your own self-will?

If you answer “no” to either of these questions, and would like help, please take action.

Alcoholics Anonymous
We Can Help

In AA, our experience is that none of us can recover alone, but that together we can.

AA does not diagnose anyone with a drinking problem.

“We do not like to pronounce any individual as alcoholic, but you can quickly diagnose yourself.”

AA was the first program that recognized the importance of self-admission or self- diagnosis for those suffering with a drinking problem.

Self-identification is the First Step of the Twelve Step recovery program.

If you think you have a problem with your drinking, if you cannot stop drinking on your own, ask yourself these simple questions:

Can you control how much you drink every time you drink?

Can you quit drinking and stay away from alcohol entirely on your own self-will?

If you answer “no” to either of these questions, and would like help, please take action.

Over three hundred organizations have adopted the Twelve Step Program and AA Traditions for other problems or addictions. It is important that each recovery group maintain their primary purpose, helping people recover with their shared experience.

AA has been recognized as one of the most important movements of the 20th century, offering a solution not only to those suffering from alcoholism; but to their loved ones, friends, communities. AA offers help to professionals that work with the still suffering alcoholic.

“Someday we hope that every alcoholic who journeys will find a Fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous.”

Professionals, those that work with alcoholics, commonly refer to AA recovery program as a peer mentoring organization or a mutual aid society. Those that have solved their drinking problem give back freely what was given to them.

AA does not oppose any efforts to help the alcoholic.

The AA organization is supported and operated by the member contributions
in each region or country. Newcomers may attend for free.

AA does not affiliate with any other organization or group but will cooperate with anyone to help the still suffering alcoholic.

 

You can enjoy life in sobriety.

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What to Expect from an AA Meeting.

Making the decision to go to an AA meeting can be intimidating and uncomfortable. Yet, it is a courageous first step in admitting to yourself that you may have a drinking problem that can be helped by the shared experience of recovered alcoholics.

Fortunately, every AA participant has had a similar experience. The organization itself was founded by recovering alcoholics. The success of this recovery program is based on the concept that one alcoholic has the ability to help another alcoholic, as only an alcoholic can. Experience has shown that those who do not understand this disease of alcoholism remain hopelessly unable to help us. The purpose of an AA Group is to cultivate a feeling of community and understanding to bring the program of solution to the alcoholic who still suffers.

Attendees of an AA meeting will be welcomed into the group. Discussion among new members is encouraged, but not required. Participants may share their personal stories, including commentary, experience, and readings from AA literature.

What to Expect from an AA Meeting.

Making the decision to go to an AA meeting can be intimidating and uncomfortable. Yet, it is a courageous first step in admitting to yourself that you may have a drinking problem that can be helped by the shared experience of recovered alcoholics.

Fortunately, every AA participant has had a similar experience. The organization itself was founded by recovering alcoholics. The success of this program is based on the concept that one alcoholic has the ability to help another alcoholic, as only an alcoholic can. Experience has shown that those who do not understand this disease remain hopelessly unable to help us. The purpose of an AA Group is to cultivate a feeling of community and understanding to bring the program of solution to the alcoholic who still suffers.

Attendees of an AA meeting will be welcomed into the group. Discussion among new members is encouraged, but not required. Participants may share their personal stories, including commentary, experience, and readings from AA literature.

Experience, strength and hope
is shared by members at A.A. meetings.

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24-Hour Helpline Available

Our Helpline and Chatline are staffed with volunteers, members of Alcoholics Anonymous who once had a drinking problem.

Anonymous is not an anonymous organization.

Your anonymity will be protected. AA does not keep information on their members nor track or record who contacts them.

Members remain anonymous to protect the organization, their professional and private lives, the lives of others and most importantly, those seeking help with their drinking problem.

Our volunteers can help you find meetings in your neighborhood; they can offer contacts to other AA members willing to share their experience with you.

The East Bay Intergroup service area currently has 931 meetings in 18 cities with 125 different meeting locations.

24-Hour Helpline Available

Our Helpline and Chatline are staffed with volunteers, members of Alcoholics Anonymous who once had a drinking problem.

Anonymous is not an anonymous organization.

Your anonymity will be protected. AA does not keep information on their members nor track or record who contacts them.

Members remain anonymous to protect the organization, their professional and private lives, the lives of others and most importantly, those seeking help with their drinking problem.

Our volunteers can help you find meetings in your neighborhood; they can offer contacts to other AA members willing to share their experience with you.

The East Bay Intergroup service area currently has 931 meetings in 18 cities with 125 different meeting locations.

Our Helpline is Answered by Volunteer A.A. Members

Need to talk with someone now?

Call A.A. hotline now. AA is an Alcoholism Recovery Program
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A member of A.A. will answer your call. AA is an Alcoholism Recovery Program
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24 Helpline Available

The A.A. Program

To understand the solution, we must first understand the problem.

The AA approach to the disease of alcoholism is holistic. AA is a program of recovery for body, mind, and spirit.

Alcoholism is an illness that affects people of all ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, genders, abilities, orientations, nationalities, cultures, ethnicities and beliefs. Loss of control for the alcoholic is not measured by how long one drinks or how much one drinks.
When your life feels out of control, you think drinking might have something to do with it, it usually does.

“Not too long ago, alcoholism was viewed as a moral problem. Today, many regard it primarily as a health problem. To each problem drinker, it will always remain an intensely personal matter. Alcoholics who approach AA frequently ask questions that apply to their own experience, their own fears, and their own hopes for a better way of life.

There are many different ideas about what alcoholism really is.

The explanation that seems to make sense to most AA members is that alcoholism is an illness, a progressive illness, which can never be cured but which, like some other diseases, can be arrested.

Going one step further, many AA’s feel that the illness represents the combination of a physical sensitivity to alcohol and a mental obsession with drinking, which, regardless of consequences, cannot be broken by willpower alone.”
Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. Frequently asked questions about AA, P-2

The A.A. Program

To understand the solution, we must first understand the problem.

The AA approach to the disease of alcoholism is holistic. AA is a program of recovery for body, mind, and spirit.

Alcoholism is an illness that affects people of all ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, genders, abilities, orientations, nationalities, cultures, ethnicities and beliefs. Loss of control for the alcoholic is not measured by how long one drinks or how much one drinks.
When your life feels out of control, you think drinking might have something to do with it, it usually does.

“Not too long ago, alcoholism was viewed as a moral problem. Today, many regard it primarily as a health problem. To each problem drinker, it will always remain an intensely personal matter. Alcoholics who approach AA frequently ask questions that apply to their own experience, their own fears, and their own hopes for a better way of life.

There are many different ideas about what alcoholism really is.

The explanation that seems to make sense to most AA members is that alcoholism is an illness, a progressive illness, which can never be cured but which, like some other diseases, can be arrested.

Going one step further, many AA’s feel that the illness represents the combination of a physical sensitivity to alcohol and a mental obsession with drinking, which, regardless of consequences, cannot be broken by willpower alone.”
Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. Frequently asked questions about AA, P-2

Alcoholics Anonymous

Our basic text, also known as the “Big Book,” includes clear cut directions for recovery, as well as many personal stories of those who have used the program to solve their problem.

Alcoholics Anonymous

Our basic text, also known as the “Big Book,” includes clear cut directions for recovery, as well as many personal stories of those who have used the program to solve their problem.

AA's basic text. AA is an Alcoholism Recovery Program

A Resource for the Helping Professional

Freedom from alcoholism, freely given by those who have recovered.

Professionals who work with alcoholics share a common purpose with Alcoholics Anonymous: to help the alcoholic stop drinking and lead a healthy, productive life.

AA members can serve as a source of personal experience with a program of recovery. Recovery experts know that an ongoing support system is essential for recovering alcoholics.

The AA organization maintains service committees whose members are trained to speak to professionals, to help the greater community better understand alcoholism and the program of recovery.

Refer those you help to AA. AA is an Alcoholism Recovery Program

AA does not oppose anyone trying to help the alcoholic.

AA has a long history of cooperating but not affiliating with or endorsing other organizations, programs, or institutions. We understand the importance of maintaining communication with professionals such as doctors or other health care professionals, members of the clergy, law enforcement and court officials, educators, social workers, alcoholism counselors, therapists, human resource professionals, or others who deal with alcoholics in the course of their work.

Many members in AA found the program of recovery through a referral by professionals who understand the illness of alcoholism and the solution AA provides.

If you are a professional working with an alcoholic, please have your clients call our helpline. We’re happy to help them find a meeting and support in their area. If they request a “12-Step Call,” we’ll put them in touch with a recovering member of AA in their area who will act as an initial contact for them.

Our 12-Step volunteers serve to bridge the divide for newcomers by answering questions, introducing the newcomer to meetings, and sharing their experience, strength, and hope in recovery from alcoholism.

“Times change, people change, the language may change. But the disease of alcoholism does not change. It always kills.” -Bill W

A Resource for the Helping Professional

Freedom from alcoholism, freely given by those who have recovered.

Professionals who work with alcoholics share a common purpose with Alcoholics Anonymous: to help the alcoholic stop drinking and lead a healthy, productive life.

AA members can serve as a source of personal experience with a program of recovery. Recovery experts know that an ongoing support system is essential for recovering alcoholics.

The AA organization maintains service committees whose members are trained to speak to professionals, to help the greater community better understand alcoholism and the program of recovery.

Refer those you help to AA. AA is an Alcoholism Recovery Program

AA does not oppose anyone trying to help the alcoholic.

AA has a long history of cooperating but not affiliating with or endorsing other organizations, programs, or institutions. We understand the importance of maintaining communication with professionals such as doctors or other health care professionals, members of the clergy, law enforcement and court officials, educators, social workers, alcoholism counselors, therapists, human resource professionals, or others who deal with alcoholics in the course of their work.

Many members in AA found recovery through a referral by professionals who understand the illness of alcoholism and the solution AA provides.

If you are a professional working with an alcoholic, please have your clients call our helpline. We’re happy to help them find a meeting and support in their area. If they request a “12-Step Call,” we’ll put them in touch with a recovering member of AA in their area who will act as an initial contact for them.

Our 12-Step volunteers serve to bridge the divide for newcomers by answering questions, introducing the to meetings, and sharing their experience, strength, and hope in recovery from alcoholism.

“Times change, people change, the language may change. But the disease of alcoholism does not change. It always kills.” -Bill W

East Bay Intergroup, Inc.

The primary purpose of East Bay Intergroup is to help inform the greater community about AA and alcoholism so that those who need help can find recovery from alcoholism. East Bay Intergroup is an organization created and sustained by AA groups in the San Francisco East Bay.

East Bay Intergroup, Inc.

The primary purpose of East Bay Intergroup is to help inform the greater community about AA and alcoholism so that those who need help can find recovery from alcoholism. East Bay Intergroup is an organization created and sustained by AA groups in the San Francisco East Bay.

Alcoholism Recovery meeting place

Al-Anon Family Groups offer help and hope.

The Al-Anon organization believes that alcoholism is a family disease.
Al-Anon Family Groups also provide support for Alateen in many communities. Alateen is for teenagers who have been affected by someone else’s alcoholism.

Alcoholism frequently affects the loved ones of alcoholics. Al-Anon uses the shared experience of its members to help newcomers better understand alcoholism, and to find support from others who have faced similar experiences.

Al-Anon Family Groups is a Twelve Step program of recovery.
Their members are made up of people concerned with someone’s drinking problem.

Al-Anon Family Groups offer help and hope.

The Al-Anon organization believes that alcoholism is a family disease.
Al-Anon Family Groups also provide support for Alateen in many communities. Alateen is for teenagers who have been affected by someone else’s alcoholism.

Alcoholism frequently affects the loved ones of alcoholics. Al-Anon uses the shared experience of its members to help newcomers better understand alcoholism, and to find support from others who have faced similar experiences.

Al-Anon Family Groups is a Twelve Step program of recovery.
Their members are made up of people concerned with someone’s drinking problem.

East Bay A.A. At a Glance

50

Est. Members in the East Bay Area

100

Meetings Per Week in the East Bay Area

300

Hotline Calls per Month in the East Bay